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Saint Barthelemy

Capital:

Gustavia

Description:

Saint Barthelemy ("St. Barts"), a French-speaking Caribbean island commonly known as St. Barts, is known for its white-sand beaches and designer shops. The capital, Gustavia, encircling a yacht-filled harbor, has high-end restaurants and historical attractions like the Wall House, whose exhibits highlight the island’s Swedish colonial era. Perched above town is 17th-century Fort Karl, looking out over popular Shell Beach.

Major Cities:

Gustavia
La Grande Saline
Toiny
Marigot
Le Gouverneur
Petit Cul-de-Sac
Terre Neuve

3★+ Accommodation Starting At:

$368

(Per Room, Per Night)

Atlandis Top 3 'Things to Do'

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Gustavia

Gustavia, St. Barts' red-roofed capital, is a small harbor town and the best place for shopping in St. Barts. Chic boutiques, duty free shops, and art galleries line the streets, luring passengers disembarking from the many cruise ships that call here.

Foodies will also love tasting their way around Gustavia. Gourmet St. Barts restaurants serve mouthwatering French-inspired cuisine, from crepes to croissants and succulent, fresh seafood.

St. Jean

In the heart of the island, the tiny village of St. Jean is the most popular tourist area outside of Gustavia, with fabulous restaurants, shopping plazas, and boutiques.

Luxury villas peek out from tropical foliage on the hillsides, and the island's only airport lies nearby. Only small aircraft are accommodated here and only during daylight hours. Most flights servicing the island come from St. Martin/St. Maarten.

Lorient

On the north coast, not far from St. Jean, the charming village of Lorient is the site of the island's first French settlement. Today, the top things to see here include a 19th-century Catholic church, a few shops, and a fantastic surf beach.

Built of local stone cut to size by women, the Lorient Church (Eglise de Lorient) uses conch shells as holy water basins.

The far end of Lorient Beach has pounding waves that are prime surfing waters. The rest of this long beach is usually calm, quiet, and ideal for swimming.

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'Things To Do' information provided by Viator and TripAdvisor. Contact Atlandis Vacations for the best prices.